What Is Female Squirting Exactly? Well, Scientists Found It May Not Be What You Think.

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What is female squirting exactly? Well ladies, you know that fluid you sometimes squirt during sexy time?

Scientists claim they have finally discovered what it is. 

(And file this under “things I never needed to know.” Really. I did not need to know this.) 

A group of Japanese scientists used blue dye to determine that the liquid expelled when females squirt is mostly watered down urine.

So what exactly is squirting?

According to WebMD, squirting is the fluid expelled from the vagina during orgasm.

It’s important to note that female squirting and female ejaculation are not the same thing.

Squirting refers to the involuntary expulsion of an odorless fluid “as clear as water,” amounting to up to 10 tbsp. 

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On the other hand, female ejaculate is a thicker, milky substance that does not “gush out” and only amounts to 1 tbsp at most. It is secreted by the female prostate (also known as Skene’s glands).

The number of just how many women experience the “tsunami of love” varies depending on the study.

Reports say anywhere between 10 and 54 percent of women have squirted. So, contrary to what you may think, not everyone is doing it. Nor is it necessary for sexual pleasure.

As for what the liquid actually is that you’re squirting? According to the Japanese urologists who conducted the study, scientists weren’t sure.

In their research report titled, ‘Enhanced Visualization of Female Squirting,’ the authors wrote:

“Little is known about the composition of this fluid and the mechanism by which the fluid is discharged.”

In order to find the answers to clarify what is female squirting, the researchers decided to conduct a little experiment.

And by little, we mean little. It seems that they had difficulty finding willing participants. You don’t say?

Eventually, they were able to find five test subjects –  two in their 30s, two in their 40s, and one in their 50s, who were all self-professed veteran squirters. 

“The subjects in the current study were women who were able to squirt. They were not sex workers.”

Additionally, none of them suffered from coital urinary incontinence.

The doctors started the experiment by draining excess urine from each woman’s bladder using a urethral catheter.

This was followed by a blue-dyed saline solution that was flushed back up into the bladder.

According to the report:

“Sexual stimulation was provided to facilitate squirting, which was videotaped and verified.”

Three of the five women were able to squirt with masturbation alone, the other two needed to call in male reinforcements.

Somehow the members of the Miyabi Urogyne Clinic team were able to collect the secretions in sterile cups (I don’t wanna know).

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The report reads:

“The secretions were collected in sterile cups, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and glucose levels were measured.”

As for the findings? 

“The discharged fluid was blue in all cases, confirming the bladder as the source.”

In layman’s terms, it was pee.

But hold up, not so fast. While the main component was urine, most of the samples also contained prostate-specific antigen (which does not originate in the bladder.) This would suggest that there is an overlap between squirting and ejaculating. 

“The main component of squirt fluid is urine, but may also contain fluid from Skene’s glands (female prostate).”

The Skene’s glands release lubricating fluid to the urethra (the tube responsible for moving urine out of the bladder). It makes sense that some of this fluid would make its way into the bladder. Scientists also believe fluid excretions from these glands may account for female ejaculation.

The results of the study were published in the International Journal of Urology.

This isn’t the first time that scientists have tried to pinpoint the secret sauce in love sauce.

A 2015 study of seven women used ultrasound to see what goes on in the bladder during sexual stimulation and squirting. 

Researchers discovered that the bladder noticeably fills just before squirting, and is empty just after squirting, indicating that “squirting is essentially the involuntary emission of urine during sexual activity although a marginal contribution of prostatic secretions to the emitted fluid often exists.”

In addition, a review article published in the International Urogynecology Journal in 2017 stated that squirting “is a form of urine containing various concentrations of urea, creatinine, and uric acid.”

It’s science, folks. 

And while we now know more than we ever wanted to about squirt juice, the mystery of what triggers it still remains.

 

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